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Women’s March 2018: Five Things I Learned



For the second year in a row I inadvertently found myself at the Women’s March. Last year I was going to an outdoor yoga event and walked right into the march and I couldn’t believe that I got to be part of the historic event. This year I was leaving church and decided to stroll around the area and noticed the crowd and once again was happy to discover that I was once again part of the movement. I think the universe is telling me something. I couldn’t be happier, because the message of the march is something I totally identify with:  equality, justice, freedom, and inclusion for all. These are principles I think we can all agree on without using the word feminism. But that’s exactly what feminism is: equality for both genders. I was able to listen to several speakers at this years march in Miami and here are 5 things I heard that stood out.  


  1. The march for equality begins with black women  
    Women of color have been and in most ways are still largely underrepresented in all parts of life. We vote more than anyone else, yet we’re the most underrepresented group in politics. This is the same everywhere you look: corporate, business, academia, and many more. But that’s changing as we’re galvanizing to run for offices, we’re more ambitious than any other group, and we’re receiving higher education degrees than other group. At the Miami march this was something most of the speakers brought attention to, that black women are the group we all should be looking at because of our track record to do what’s in the best interest for all.  

  2. We must stand in solidarity with all women  
    We’re all in this together. There are some that associate the Women’s  March with men bashing, yes even in 2018, but I strongly believe those individuals decidedly choose not to see the truth. The truth is that all women should be feminist, someone who wants to see equality for all genders and people.  
      
  3. Men are an essential part of the movement  
    Feminism is not just about or for women. It’s about equality for all. I was really happy to see a great turn out of men at the march as this is part of the cause. If we’re trying to change the status quo we’ve got to be in this together as a team. Men need to be at the table. They need to understand what we’re marching for and why. It’s important that these conversation involve both genders as equality cannot be reached without their involvement.  

  4. Power to the Polls 
    Vote vote vote. Marches are great to the extent they can create real change. And this year is the midterm elections where we get to vote for our local and state leaders. This is in many ways far more important than the voting for the president. I implore you to start educating yourself and not simply rely on the media for knowledge. And I’m praying that I get my citizenship by November to participate in my first election. Let go out there and create real impactful change.  

  5. You are part of the movement  
    Regardless of your political affiliation you are part of this movement. It’s time you examine your beliefs and your personal values to see if they align with your political stance. Too often we go with the masses, family, or our church. Make your own decision. There are too many people who don’t recognize the cognitive dissonance in their belief and action system. You believe one thing, but vote for the diametric opposite of that belief. Decisions are not easy, that’s why I beg you to truly examine yourself and do what sits well with your soul.  

I’m thrilled about the change I see awaiting us as women, as a black woman, and as a nation. America is the greatest country on this planet and I am blessed everyday to call it home. We’re facing some challenging times at the present but I have full faith that we will overcome and be stronger, better. Let’s go out there and vote to make it happen.  


Yours Always and Faithfully,  

Marie 
  

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